Please note: You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please update to IE10 here to properly experience the ATI website.

Category Archive: News

LONDON – New analysis from Publish What You Fund indicates that 25% of global aid now meets transparency standards.

Donors promised in 2011 to open up their books, publishing details of their development projects to a common open standard, the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI).

Despite progress over the last five years, analysis of 46 aid donors found that most have failed to uphold this commitment. The report’s authors argue that this will limit the impact of aid, as information is critical to effective policy.

Rupert Simons, the CEO of Publish What You Fund, said:

“The ‘data revolution’ isn’t reaching the world’s poorest countries. The 2016 Aid Transparency Index shows that only 10 out of 46 of the world’s largest and most influential donors provided enough information to enable recipient governments to plan, or for citizens to hold their governments to account.

Aid transparency is critical to helping countries meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SGDs), agreed in September 2015. Many countries need aid to help them meet the goals, so their citizens and governments need access to information on development finance and projects.

Jeremiah Sam, Project Coordinator at Penplusbytes, Ghana – the leading institution promoting effective governance through technology in Africa, said:

“Information on what aid my country has received is essential to be able to hold the government to account. Now more than ever, more donors need to step up to the challenge. There is a demand from civil society.

For example, having access to data enabled us to better inform citizens about how much government received from donors. This empowered citizens to demand transparency and accountability in government expenditure and decision making processes. Access to more information will pave the way for similar successes.

Citizens need to be armed with such knowledge to make informed choices especially at the polls and demand good governance, which will contribute to citizen’s ability to advocate for policies that will improve their living standards and well-being.”

Helen Clark, Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), which topped the list for transparency in the 2016 Aid Transparency Index, said:

“Transparency is important for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals and development in general. It is encouraging that there has been a marked improvement in aid transparency – but more needs to be done in order to ensure that development is as effective as possible.”

Publish What You Fund’s analysis classed twelve organisations as performing poorly. Of these, eight do not make information on their aid contributions publicly accessible to IATI. A further sixteen are not yet publishing good enough data to meet their transparency commitment, agreed in 2011 to make development more effective.

The list includes some of the world’s largest aid donors, such as the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and Japan’s International Cooperation Agency (JICA). The report’s authors argue that more and better data from these organizations would help them and their partners get more out of each dollar spent.

The Foreign Ministries of Italy, France and Japan are of particular concern. All have failed to meet their commitments as members of the G7 to provide open, timely and transparent data on development assistance – indicating a lack of regard for transparency or respect for their partners.

Rupert Simons said:

“Major donors lagging behind have no excuses: we know it can be done. There are now almost 400 publishers of all shapes and sizes to the IATI registry – five years ago there was one.”

ENDS

Following commitments, a quarter of global aid now meets transparency standards

(WASHINGTON, 13 April 2016) – Five years after the world’s major foreign aid donors committed to robust standards for making their data public and more easily accessible, 25 percent of global aid now meets them, according to a new report from an organization that tracks the transparency of foreign assistance information.

In a ranking of 46 aid agencies and organizations accounting for 98 percent of foreign aid globally, the group Publish What You Fund assessed how they delivered on promises made in 2011 to open up their books by publishing details of their development projects to a common open standard, the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI). Publish What You Fund, for its part, uses the information from the IATI Registry and other publicly available resources to make its assessments on whether agencies are publishing their information in a manner that is timely, accessible, comprehensive, and comparable.

Coming first in the 2016 Aid Transparency Index ranking, which is the leading independent measure of aid transparency worldwide, is the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), with a 93.3 percent transparency score.  The U.S. Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), one of six U.S. agencies in the ranking, placed second with 89.6 percent, while UNICEF was ranked third at 89.5 percent.

In all, Publish What You Fund ranked 10 donors, representing a quarter of all aid globally, in its “very good” category and thus meeting their commitment to aid transparency made in 2011 at the Fourth High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness in Busan, South Korea.  The other seven are the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (UK-DFID), the Global Fund, the World Bank-International Development Association (WB-IDA), the Inter-American Development Bank (IADB), the Asian Development Bank (AsDB), the government of Sweden and the African Development Bank (AfDB).

For the first time, all of the U.S. government’s aid agencies that are ranked scored at least as high as the “fair” category, with three of those just short of the 60 percent score needed to rank as “good.”  Publish What You Fund noted that with the two biggest U.S. agencies that administer foreign assistance, USAID and the Department of State, there is increased political commitment to meeting transparency goals through a more systematic effort to revamp information systems.

Globally, more than half of the 46 aid organizations covered by the Index still fall into the lowest three categories, scoring below 60 percent and demonstrating that the publication of timely, comparable and disaggregated information about their development projects to the IATI Registry is far from complete.

The report’s authors argue that this will limit the impact of aid, as information is critical to effective policymaking in donor countries, while civil society organizations and journalists in developing countries will continue to face major challenges in accessing up-to-date information about aid programs and holding their governments accountable for how money is spent.

“Clearly, from our analysis, the ‘data revolution’ still isn’t reaching the world’s poorest countries,” said Rupert Simons, CEO of Publish What You Fund. “The 2016 Aid Transparency Index shows that only 10 out of 46 of the world’s largest and most influential donors provided enough information to enable recipient governments to plan, or for citizens to hold their governments to account.”

“Transparency is important for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals and development in general.  It is encouraging that there has been a marked improvement in aid transparency – but more needs to be done in order to ensure that development is as effective as possible,” said Helen Clark, Administrator of the UNDP, which leads the Index.

Une nouvelle analyse de Publish What You Fund indique que les principaux organismes français chargés de l’administration et de l’exécution des projets d’aide au développement international sont globalement défaillants à respecter les engagements qu’ils ont pris en matière de transparence de l’aide, en 2016, l’année même où la France préside le Partenariat pour un gouvernement ouvert.

Préalablement à la publication par l’OCDE de nouveaux chiffres sur les flux d’aide mondiaux, l’indice de 2016 sur la transparence de l’aide, paru par Publish What You Fund, a mis en évidence que

  • le Ministère de l’Économie, des Finances et de l’Emploi (MINEFI) (qui gère une part importante de l’aide de la France) est le troisième bailleur de fonds le moins performant de l’indice, devançant seulement la Chine et les EAU. Comparé avec les États membres de l’Union européenne inclus dans l’indice MINEFI se classe au-dessous de l’Italie. Une quantité limitée d’informations est mise à disposition, de façon incohérente
  • le Ministère des Affaires étrangères et du Développement international ( MAEDI) (qui administre l’aide humanitaire, l’aide alimentaire et les fonds liés à la gouvernance démocratique) n’a pas remédié ces dernières années à son absence de publication d’informations importantes, ou de leur publication dans des formats accessibles. Comparé avec les États membres de l’Union européenne inclus dans l’indice MAEDI se classe au-dessous de la Belgique
  • l’Agence Française de Développement (AFD) (qui gère la majeure partie de l’aide bilatérale française) a fait d’importants progrès qui sont encourageants depuis les dernières mesures prises en 2014 et affiche un engagement renouvelé à contribuer à la transparence de l’aide, bien que l’Agence ait encore des améliorations à faire pour veiller à ce que les informations qu’elle publie soient suffisamment complètes pour être utiles à d’autres.

Anne Paugam, directrice générale de l’Agence Française de Développement (AFD), a fait remarquer à propos des progrès réalisés par son agence : 

La progression de l’Agence Française de développement dans l’Indice de la transparence de l’aide 2016 reflète l’engagement fort de l’Agence pour la transparence de l’aide. Cette politique de transparence est au fondement de la démarche de responsabilité sociétale engagée par l’AFD vis-à-vis de ses parties prenantes en France comme dans les pays partenaires. Elle est également un gage d’efficacité en termes d’impact de développement. L’AFD poursuivra en 2016 ses efforts pour accroître encore la transparence de son action.

Pourtant, malgré ces améliorations, il reste inquiétant de voir qu’aucun des organismes donateurs de la France n’a tenu son engagement à faire en sorte que le financement du développement soit transparent et d’en rendre compte à tous les citoyens d’ici décembre 2015, comme convenu dans le cadre du Partenariat de Busan pour une coopération efficace au service du développement. Or la France avait même renouvelé cet engagement vis-à-vis de la transparence dans son plan d’action national dans le cadre du Partenariat pour un gouvernement ouvert en 2015, dont elle assure la coprésidence.

Le rapport fait valoir que, pour tenir véritablement cet engagement, plus de 80 % des informations sur l’aide doivent être publiées selon la norme reconnue concernant les données ouvertes, l’Initiative internationale pour la transparence de l’aide (IITA). La transparence de l’aide est essentielle pour assurer l’efficacité du soutien au développement, et permettre ainsi aux gouvernements bénéficiaires d’établir leur budget de manière précise et à leurs citoyens de leur demander des comptes.

Rupert Simons, CEO, Publish What You Fund, a déclaré :

« Nous nous félicitons de l’engagement fort que l’AFD affiche depuis 2014 à améliorer la transparence de l’Agence. Il reste encore du travail à faire, mais nous sommes confiants que nous y arriverons. L’écart grandissant entre l’AFD d’une part, et le MAEDI et le MINEFI de l’autre, est pour nous une situation très préoccupante. Dans le cadre de son propre plan d’action national, le gouvernement dans son entier s’est engagé à ouvrir ses comptes. Nous attendons de l’ensemble du gouvernement à ce qu’il tienne ses promesses et à ce qu’il publie ce qu’il finance. »

Jeremiah Sam, coordonnateur de projet à Penplusbytes au Ghana, la principale institution chargée de la promotion d’une gouvernance effective grâce aux technologies en Afrique, a déclaré :

« Il est essentiel d’avoir des informations sur le type d’aide que mon pays reçoit : c’est ce qui a permis d’autonomiser les citoyens à exiger de la transparence et à demander des comptes au sujet des dépenses publiques et des processus de prise de décision du gouvernement.

Les citoyens doivent être armés de ces connaissances pour plaider en faveur de politiques qui vont améliorer leurs conditions de vie et leur bien-être. »

 

FIN

Wie aus einer neuen Analyse von Publish What You Fund hervorgeht, hat Deutschland seine Verpflichtungen zur Transparenz bei der Entwicklungshilfe nicht erfüllt.

Im Vorfeld neuer OECD-Daten zu Mittelflüssen in der weltweiten Entwicklungshilfe zeigt der Aid Transparency Index 2016 von Publish What You Fund, dass die höchstplatzierte deutsche Organisation – BMZ-GIZ –weltweit auf Rang 18 liegt. Unter den 46 erfassten Geberorganisationen liegt sie damit hinter dem britischen Department for International Development, der Asian Development Bank, der African Development Bank, Schweden, Kanada, den Niederlanden und Dänemark, um nur einige zu nennen.

Die Auswertung von Publish What You Fund ergibt weiter:

Die Entwicklungsbank des Bundesministeriums für wirtschaftliche Zusammenarbeit und Entwicklung (BMZ-KfW) veröffentlicht keine regelmäßigen, ausführlichen und aufschlussreichen Informationen zu seiner Aktivität.
Die Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit des Bundesministeriums für wirtschaftliche Zusammenarbeit und Entwicklung (BMZ-GIZ), die den Großteil der deutschen Entwicklungshilfe durchführt, hat kleinere Verbesserungen vorgenommen, muss jedoch die Bereitstellung von Informationen erweitern.

2011 hatte sich Deutschland zusammen mit anderen Gebernationen im Rahmen der Entwicklungspartnerschaft von Busan verpflichtet, seine Entwicklungsfinanzen und Projektinformationen bis Dezember 2015 transparent und für alle Bürger zugänglich zu machen. Weder BMZ-KfW noch BMZ-GIZ haben diese Zusagen eingehalten.

Transparente Hilfe ist bessere Hilfe: Empfängerländer können so besser planen und budgetieren, und geben ihren Bürgern die Informationen, um ihre Regierungen zur Rechenschaft zu ziehen. Das gilt besonders in der Umsetzung der Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (Sustainable Development Goals, SDGs), zu der sich die Bundesrepublik and alle UN-Mitgliedslaeder 2015 verplichtet haben.

Rupert Simons, Geschäftsführer von Publish What You Fund, sagte:

“Deutschland leistet einen wesentlichen Beitrag zur weltweiten Entwicklungshilfe, und sollte daher auch in der Transparenz richtungsweisend agieren. Auch die Ausgaben in anderen Bereichen – wie zum Beispiel für die Flüchtlingskrise – werden effektiver sein, wenn für Offenheit und Rechenschaftspflicht gesorgt ist.”

Am 7. April hat die Bundesrepublik im Rahmen eines deutsch-französischen Ministerrats angekündigt, Deutschland werde 2016 seine Kandidatur für die Partnerschaft für eine offene Regierung (‘Open Government Partnership’) einreichen. Infolgen diesen Beschlusses ist zu erwarten, dass sich die Regierung zukünftig auch in der Entwicklungshilfe erneut zur Transparenz bekennt und diese auch umsetzt.